The sentiment echoed by participants of the fourth annual Northwest Jewelry Conference (NWJC), August 12-14 Seattle, Washington, was “thought-provoking.” While history, artistry and collectability have become hallmarks of the NWJC, students were drawn into interesting conversations regarding Rene Lalique’s darker motivations, the origins of Art Deco and intriguing gem misclassifications. This was an intense weekend of jewelry discovery for collectors, historians, dealers and appraisers who came to Seattle from across the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Dr. Stefanie Walker opened the program with “Bats, Bad Dreams and Damsels in Distress - the Darker Side of Rene Lalique’s Jewelry.” What motivated Lalique to depict creatures of the night and ladies in peril, and then abruptly turn his attention away from jewelry? Walker’s take on the subject was a fascinating look into the world of this compelling artist. Dr. Çiğdem Lüle presented on “Garnet: Treasured Gem of the Ancients,” providing an archaeogemologist’s perspective. Lüle’s personal research into the ancients’ use of garnets, long forgotten trade routes and proper naming of gems found at archaeological sites highlighted a spirited presentation. Dr. Walker’s second presentation was on “Castellani and Italian Archaeological Jewelry,” a Victorian period revival. She gave insight to the Castellani family and their recreations and interpretations of jewelry unearthed from Etruscan, Roman, Greek and Byzantine sites. Walker curated the 2004 Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts exhibition on...
The sentiment echoed by participants of the fourth annual Northwest Jewelry Conference (NWJC), August 12-14 Seattle, Washington, was “thought-provoking.” While history, artistry and collectability have become hallmarks of the NWJC, students were drawn into interesting conversations regarding Rene Lalique’s darker motivations, the origins of Art Deco and intriguing gem misclassifications. This was an intense weekend of jewelry discovery for collectors, historians, dealers and appraisers who came to Seattle from across the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Dr. Stefanie Walker opened the program with “Bats, Bad Dreams and Damsels in Distress - the Darker Side of Rene Lalique’s Jewelry.” What motivated Lalique to depict creatures of the night and ladies in peril, and then abruptly turn his attention away from jewelry? Walker’s take on the subject was a fascinating look into the world of this compelling artist. Dr. Çiğdem Lüle presented on “Garnet: Treasured Gem of the Ancients,” providing an archaeogemologist’s perspective. Lüle’s personal research into the ancients’ use of garnets, long forgotten trade routes and proper naming of gems found at archaeological sites highlighted a spirited presentation. Dr. Walker’s second presentation was on “Castellani and Italian Archaeological Jewelry,” a Victorian period revival. She gave insight to the Castellani family and their recreations and interpretations of jewelry unearthed from Etruscan, Roman, Greek and Byzantine sites. Walker curated the 2004 Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts exhibition on...

Northwest Jewelry Conference Challenges Perceptions

Posted on November 1, 2016 by NGL Staff

The sentiment echoed by participants of the fourth annual Northwest Jewelry Conference (NWJC), August 12-14 Seattle, Washington, was “thought-provoking.” While history, artistry and collectability have become hallmarks of the NWJC, students were drawn into interesting conversations regarding Rene Lalique’s darker motivations, the origins of Art Deco and intriguing gem misclassifications. This was an intense weekend of jewelry discovery for collectors, historians, dealers and appraisers who came to Seattle from across the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Dr. Stefanie Walker opened the program with “Bats, Bad Dreams and Damsels in Distress - the Darker Side of Rene Lalique’s Jewelry.” What motivated Lalique to depict creatures of the night and ladies in peril, and then abruptly turn his attention away from jewelry? Walker’s take on the subject was a fascinating look into the world of this compelling artist. Dr. Çiğdem Lüle presented on “Garnet: Treasured Gem of the Ancients,” providing an archaeogemologist’s perspective. Lüle’s personal research into the ancients’ use of garnets, long forgotten trade routes and proper naming of gems found at archaeological sites highlighted a spirited presentation. Dr. Walker’s second presentation was on “Castellani and Italian Archaeological Jewelry,” a Victorian period revival. She gave insight to the Castellani family and their recreations and interpretations of jewelry unearthed from Etruscan, Roman, Greek and Byzantine sites. Walker curated the 2004 Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts exhibition on...

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