A common request from clients to the appraiser is to email a PDF of the appraisal to them or directly to their insurance agent (which you will soon see is not a good practice). Some appraisers may already have chosen to go this paperless route while others that deliver a hard copy, may or may not offer a PDF as well. While this practice of emailing a PDF may seem perfectly fine, there are some basic rules to follow to protect yourself when doing so. In our desire to become more paperless as a society, the idea of emailing a PDF is certainly not a bad idea. While most appraisers still deliver a hard copy of the appraisal, the request for a PDF as well is becoming more prevalent. The first rule before emailing a PDF may seem pretty basic—be sure to sign the appraisal before scanning it to a PDF. For anyone that is using some type of scanning method via machine scanner that creates PDFs, this signature step is probably not overlooked as the hard copies are printed, signed, then scanned—a normal progression. Of course, this method is not a paper saver if printed first. However, if a computer-generated appraisal, whether from one of the software products available or from word processing is used, then the signature line will likely be blank. You should explore a method of inserting an electronic signature to the document before saving as a PDF. Word processing will allow the insertion of a signature depending on the format you have it saved. For example, you can easily insert a jpeg file of your signature where needed. You can use an appraisal service agreement to stipulate that an electronic signature will be used for the appraisal, thus saving paper and eliminating the print, sign, and scan steps. As long as this is stipulated before accepting payment, an electronic signature is fine. Of note of course is never to email the actual Word document which could be altered. That should go without saying. While a PDF is more secure and harder to alter, in some cases it can be, so be aware of that. For additional security you may...
A common request from clients to the appraiser is to email a PDF of the appraisal to them or directly to their insurance agent (which you will soon see is not a good practice). Some appraisers may already have chosen to go this paperless route while others that deliver a hard copy, may or may not offer a PDF as well. While this practice of emailing a PDF may seem perfectly fine, there are some basic rules to follow to protect yourself when doing so. In our desire to become more paperless as a society, the idea of emailing a PDF is certainly not a bad idea. While most appraisers still deliver a hard copy of the appraisal, the request for a PDF as well is becoming more prevalent. The first rule before emailing a PDF may seem pretty basic—be sure to sign the appraisal before scanning it to a PDF. For anyone that is using some type of scanning method via machine scanner that creates PDFs, this signature step is probably not overlooked as the hard copies are printed, signed, then scanned—a normal progression. Of course, this method is not a paper saver if printed first. However, if a computer-generated appraisal, whether from one of the software products available or from word processing is used, then the signature line will likely be blank. You should explore a method of inserting an electronic signature to the document before saving as a PDF. Word processing will allow the insertion of a signature depending on the format you have it saved. For example, you can easily insert a jpeg file of your signature where needed. You can use an appraisal service agreement to stipulate that an electronic signature will be used for the appraisal, thus saving paper and eliminating the print, sign, and scan steps. As long as this is stipulated before accepting payment, an electronic signature is fine. Of note of course is never to email the actual Word document which could be altered. That should go without saying. While a PDF is more secure and harder to alter, in some cases it can be, so be aware of that. For additional security you may...

Appraisals – PDF Formats

Posted on March 1, 2019 by Richard B. Drucker, GIA GG, Honorary FGA

A common request from clients to the appraiser is to email a PDF of the appraisal to them or directly to their insurance agent (which you will soon see is not a good practice). Some appraisers may already have chosen to go this paperless route while others that deliver a hard copy, may or may not offer a PDF as well. While this practice of emailing a PDF may seem perfectly fine, there are some basic rules to follow to protect yourself when doing so. In our desire to become more paperless as a society, the idea of emailing a PDF is certainly not a bad idea. While most appraisers still deliver a hard copy of the appraisal, the request for a PDF as well is becoming more prevalent. The first rule before emailing a PDF may seem pretty basic—be sure to sign the appraisal before scanning it to a PDF. For anyone that is using some type of scanning method via machine scanner that creates PDFs, this signature step is probably not overlooked as the hard copies are printed, signed, then scanned—a normal progression. Of course, this method is not a paper saver if printed first. However, if a computer-generated appraisal, whether from one of the software products available or from word processing is used, then the signature line will likely be blank. You should explore a method of inserting an electronic signature to the document before saving as a PDF. Word processing will allow the insertion of a signature depending on the format you have it saved. For example, you can easily insert a jpeg file of your signature where needed. You can use an appraisal service agreement to stipulate that an electronic signature will be used for the appraisal, thus saving paper and eliminating the print, sign, and scan steps. As long as this is stipulated before accepting payment, an electronic signature is fine. Of note of course is never to email the actual Word document which could be altered. That should go without saying. While a PDF is more secure and harder to alter, in some cases it can be, so be aware of that. For additional security you may...

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